The Ins and Outs of a Reverse Stock Split

When a company decides to conduct a reverse stock split, also referred to as a stock consolidation, the number of shares available to investors is reduced.

In a normal (forward) stock split, a company increases its number of outstanding shares without changing their market value. For example, one share of stock valued at $200 may split into two shares, with the shares then valued at $100 each. So, with a shareholder who holds 10 shares for a total of value of $2,000, a traditional one-to-two (1:2) stock split would change his holding to 20 shares – still valued at $2,000. The difference is that the value of each stock would change from $200 to $100